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Clos Fourtet, Saint-Emilion 1er Grand Cru Classé (B) 2005

Saint-Émilion Premier Grand Cru Classé (A), Bordeaux, France

New
Clos Fourtet, Saint-Emilion 1er Grand Cru Classé (B) 2005

Saint-Émilion Premier Grand Cru Classé (A), Bordeaux, France

Volume

Bottle

  • Bottle
  • Case of 6
  • Case of 12
£150.00
Qty
Total

£150.00

Information
Grape Varietes: Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon Wine Style: Right Bank Bordeaux Winemaker: Thierry Manoncourt Optimum Drinking: 2018-2040 Reviewer Rating: 98 Reviewer: Robert Parker Code: 103195 Fill Level: Into Neck
Estate Notes

Clos Fourtet's, Saint-Emilion 1er Grand Cru Classé 2005 comes from a great Bordeaux vintage.

The best 2005 right bank Bordeaux are rich, concentrated, with lashings of sweet, fresh fruit and sufficient tannin to warrant considerable ageing.

In the 1980s and 90s, under the watchful guidance of the Lurton family, Clos Fourtet began to acquire fame for its wines: and was awarded Grand Cru Classé status in 1996. In 2001 the estate was bought by Paris businessman Philippe Cuvelier who seems just as committed as the former owner Pierre Lurton, in pursuing the same rich vein of quality. Since his arrival he has already overseen a complete modernisation of both the vineyards and the cellar.

Reviews

"Dense ruby/purple, with notes of crushed rock, blueberry and blackberry fruit intermixed with some licorice and chocolate, this full-bodied, massive wine from proprietor Philippe Cuvelier coincides with the resurrection of this premier grand cru classé in St.-Emilion. As the wine sits in the glass, notes of espresso roast and chocolate emerge. This full-bodied classic should continue to drink well for another 25 years. This is a killer effort." Robert Parker

"Features a lovely smoldering feel, with the currant and fig paste notes now melded seamlessly with apple wood and graphite details. Long and rich, this is starting to hint at a secondary phase, showing flashes of mulled spice, tobacco and tar. The structure has brightness and energy, but moves slowly to the background." Wine Spectator